When you go through a divorce, you expect your relationship with your spouse to be colored by the flaws in your marriage and that divorce — but you may not be prepared for a lot of your peripheral relationships to change, as well. However, there are going to be hurt feelings between you and your spouse, and the people around you may take sides. 

You hope that it won’t be the case, but the truth is that family and friends may have tough decisions to make in the future. While you may have strong relationships, people who are related to you are more likely to take your side, whereas those who are related to your spouse are more likely to support them. Even if this isn’t like “taking sides” in an argument, you may notice some distance being put between yourself and others you were once close with. 

How can you handle the emotional strain of losing multiple relationships over your divorce?

First, you need to try to remember that this isn’t likely to be personal. People don’t like to be involved in conflicts, so they may be staying away to give you and your spouse time to work through your issues. Sometimes, relationships heal after a divorce is finalized and new boundaries are created. For example, if you and your spouse are still good friends following the divorce, then others may feel confident reaching out to you. However, if you’re both at odds with one another, the chances are that old family ties will be stronger than the relationship you’ve built with their family. This isn’t always the case, but it is something to prepare yourself to handle. 

Try to take this situation for what it is. You will see who is there to support you and who wants to be a part of your life. That’s a positive that you can take away from the entire situation as you work with your attorney to finalize your divorce.